Tuesday, October 13, 2015

OSHA Requirements

Sudden injuries or illnesses, some of which may be life-threatening, occur at work. The OSHA First Aid standard (29 CFR 1910.151) requires trained first-aid providers at all workplaces of any size if
there is no “infirmary, clinic, or hospital in near proximity to the workplace which is used for the treatment of all injured employees.”

In addition to first-aid requirements of 29 CFR 1910.151, several OSHA standards also require training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because sudden cardiac arrest from asphyxiation, electrocution, or exertion may occur. CPR may keep the victim alive until EMS arrives to provide the next level of medical care. However, survival from this kind of care is low, only 5-7%, according to the American Heart Association. The OSHA standards requiring CPR training are:

1910.146 Permit-required Confined Spaces
1910.266 Appendix B: Logging Operations – First-Aid and CPR Training
1910.269 Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution
1910.410 Qualifications of Dive Team
1926.950 Construction Subpart V, Power Transmission and Distribution

If an employee is expected to render first aid as part of his or her job duties, the employee is covered by the requirements of the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). This standard includes specific training requirements.

A few of the medical emergency procedures mentioned in this guide as first aid may be considered medical treatment for OSHA recordkeeping purposes. The OSHA Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses regulation (29 CFR 1904) provides specific definitions of first aid and medical treatment. If a medical emergency procedure which is considered by 29 CFR 1904 to be medical treatment is performed on an employee with an occupational injury or illness, then the injury or illness will be regarded as recordable on the OSHA 300 Log.

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